Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Martin Luther's Bondage of the Will

This audio recording of Luther's Bondage of the Will is from the Calvinist site SermonAudio.com and was produced by Still Waters Revival Books (www.swrb.com). The audio quality is not that great, but I thought the reader did a good job.

Luther considered this one of his best works along with the Galatians commentary and the Small Catechism.


Saturday, October 17, 2009

A Lutheran Jacques Migne

From Wikipedia:
Jacques Paul Migne (25 October 1800 - 24 October 1875) was a French priest who published inexpensive and widely-distributed editions of theological works, encyclopedias and the texts of the Church Fathers, with the goal of providing a universal library for the Catholic priesthood.

Migne had become convinced of the power of the press and the sheer value of raw information widely distributed. In 1836 he opened his great publishing house, Imprimerie Catholique, at Petit Montrouge, in the outlying 14th arrondissement of Paris. There he brought out in rapid succession numerous religious works meant for the use of the lesser clergy at popular prices that insured a wide circulation. The best known of these are: Scripturae sacrae cursus completus ("complete course in sacred scripture") which assembled a wide repertory of commentaries on each of the books of the Bible, and Theologiae cursus, each of them in 28 vols, 1840-5; Collection des auteurs sacrés (100 vols., 1846-8); Encyclopédie théologique (171 vols., 1844-6).

The three great series that have made his reputation were Patrologiae cursus completus, Latin series (Patrologia Latina) in 221 vols. (1844-5); Greek series (Patrologia Graeca), first published in Latin (85 vols., 1856-7); with Greek text and Latin translation (165 vols., 1857-8). Though scholars have always criticised them, these hastily edited, inexpensively printed and widely distributed texts have only slowly been replaced during a century and a half with more critically edited modern editions. Though the cheap paper of the originals has made them fragile today, the scope of the Patrologia still makes it unique and valuable, wherever modern editions do not yet exist. It is a far more complete collection of Patristic and later literature than anything that has appeared subsequently or is likely to. To create so much so quickly, Migne reprinted the best or latest earlier editions available to him. In the PG the Latin translations were often made in the renaissance before any Greek text had been printed, and so do not necessarily match the Greek text very accurately. The indexes themselves are useful for locating references in the patristic writings. The collection is now available on CD-ROM at some research libraries and an electronic version is online as a subscriber service.


My goal is to one day be a Lutheran Jacques Migne by putting together an online database of works by the Lutheran fathers in their original languages.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

“The Midnight Lion”—Gustav Adolf

Gustav Adolf (Gustavus Adolphus) was the
Swedish king whose intervention in the
Thirty Years’ War was instrumental in preventing
Roman Catholic forces from
crushing the Lutheran Church.